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    How To Get Involved
    We could use your help as we continue to rehabilitate wetland habitat along the Alouette River. At our restoration sites, we need help managing invasive plants and planting native vegetation. If you or your group is interested in helping out, please see below for more information.

    How to Get Involved

    We have generated knowledge over the past 16 years of monitoring Wapato (x̌ʷəq̓ʷə́wl̕s) (Sagittaria latifolia) and its growing process in various locations and environments. Please contact us if you or your group are interested in planting Wapato in your wetland restoration sites.


    Contact Info:

    10946 Katzie Road
    Pitt Meadows, BC V3Y 2G6

    Office: 604.460.8837
    Email: knrinfo@kdlp.ca

     

     

    Wetland Enhancement

    We could use your help as we continue to rehabilitate wetland habitat along the Alouette River. At our restoration sites, we need help managing invasive plants and planting native vegetation. If you or your group is interested in helping out, please see below for more information.

    Bird Nest Boxes

    We could also use some help monitoring the bird nest boxes we've put up along the Alouette River. For more information on Bird Box Monitoring CLICK HERE Please note that this map will be updated periodically as we continue to build and place more boxes. If you see a bird using a box, please let us know by emailing us at knrinfo@kdlp.ca. Please respect the safety and security that bird parents need for raising a healthy family - use binoculars to monitor boxes and don't approach nest boxes closer than 10 metres.

    Western Painted Turtles

    We could also use some help finding out if the western painted turtle calls the Alouette River home. The western painted turtle is a Species at Risk. Populations have been declining in the Lower Mainland due to habitat loss. It has not been observed in the Alouette River since 2007. If you see a turtle basking on a log in the sun, check to make sure it has NO red mark on the side of its head. If not, please let us know where and when you saw it!

    Red Slider Turtles

    Turtles with red marks on the side of their heads are red-eared sliders, a non-native species that people keep as pets. Because people have illegally released their pets to the wild, red-eared sliders are found all over the lower Mainland, including in the Alouette River.